1-Day “Best of” Los Angeles Itinerary

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If you only have one day in Los Angeles and want to see the highlights of the city, this is the step-by-step touring plan for you. This is a jam-packed itinerary that covers the top 5 things to do in and around Los Angeles, and it also includes breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Although it’s an ambitious Los Angeles 1-day itinerary, it has been optimized to minimize driving (and time stuck in traffic) to the greatest extent possible.

This itinerary also includes multiple points of interest in Los Angeles that are totally free, which is always a plus. Outside of meals and parking, the only stop in this 1-day Los Angeles plan that costs any money is the studio tour. Efficient and economical. Double bonus!

This is one itinerary of several I plan on making for visiting Los Angeles. Before starting this series, I tried to think of the best approach, which was a bit of a challenge. Because of the sprawling nature of Los Angeles (without strong public transit), the best multi-day approach will have each day focus on a specific area of town. The longer your visit, the more focused that area can and should be.

By contrast, a shorter visit means either spending a bit more time commuting between what I think are the absolute best spots, or still focusing on a more targeted area, and accomplishing more there by way of not losing time in traffic. Both approaches obviously have their drawbacks and upsides. In the end, I think you’re better off spending less time stuck in traffic. After all, vacation should be relaxing, not headache-inducing.

However, for this one itinerary, I’ve decided to ignore my own opinion on that, and just go for broke on hitting the highlights of Los Angeles (and beyond–a couple of the spots aren’t technically L.A., even if they’re really close). I’ve still tried to attain a bit of the best of both worlds here; the bulk of your driving is in a convenient loop and occurs mostly during off-hours.

If you have multiple days in L.A. or you would prefer to minimize drive times even further, don’t use this itinerary. We’ll have more relaxed multi-day itineraries soon, any of which will also be usable as a less-intense 1-day option, as well.

1. Malibu Sunrise

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There are a few reasons why this does not belong on this list: 1) the sun rises in the east, and the Pacific Ocean is (obviously) in the west; 2) the marine layer makes a pretty sunrise along Southern California’s coast rare, and; 3) it’s a bit of a drive from the next stop of the day. If you don’t want to get up early, skipping this stop is not a bad idea. It’s going to be a long day.

With that said, there are compelling reasons for getting up to (hopefully) see the sun rise. First, if the cloud cover is just right, you could have an amazing sky to the west. Second, it’s your only chance to see the beautiful beaches of Malibu. Finally, this drive includes a long stretch on Pacific Coast Highway, which is an awesome experience unto itself. If you want less of a drive, starting your day at the Santa Monica Pier is an option, but then you lose the PCH drive (and the Santa Monica Pier is overrated, in my opinion). On balance, we think the early wake up will be worth it, and strongly recommend El Matador Beach, which we called “Malibu’s Megastar.”

You should have time for breakfast between this stop and the next, and my recommendation for that is Malibu Farm Cafe. Located on the Malibu Pier, this is a relatively low-cost (and delicious!) way to have an ocean-view meal. Opt for something light, like an acai bowl, as it’s going to be an active day.

2. Wilshire (Blvd.) Drive

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While you could stay on the highway for a more efficient route or venture down world-famous Sunset Boulevard for a meandering stretch passing through the gated communities of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, we’d recommend driving along Wilshire Boulevard. Although it does not have the name cachet of Sunset Blvd (no films have been named after it, to my knowledge), Wilshire features just as, if not more, prominently in Los Angeles.

The reason for driving along Wilshire is because it passes a diverse lineup of architectural styles that define Los Angeles. From the Googie architecture of Zucky’s to the Spanish Colonial Revival style of Wadsworth Theater, there are a number of cool buildings to see along this stretch. Wilshire also helps give you a “feel” for Los Angeles, old and new. This map from the Los Angeles Conservancy can help you identify what you’re seeing along the drive. This is not a wow-worthy experience, but it’s worth doing.

3. The Getty Center

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Boosting the best and most valuable art collection in Los Angeles, the Getty Center has numerous galleries spread out in multiple buildings in a beautiful outdoor campus. The Getty Center is a seriously impressive place–not just one of my top places to visit in Los Angeles, but one of my favorite art museums in the world.

Fair warning: you’re not going to have enough time at the Getty Center to enjoy all–or even half–of its incredible collection. You should stay here until 1 p.m. or 2 p.m. at the absolute latest. My recommendation would be to look at an online map ahead of time, focus on 2-3 galleries you think will appeal most to you, and thoroughly enjoy those, as well as the excellent outdoor ambiance. You can always revisit the Getty Center on a future trip to Los Angeles. Here are my tips for what to see and how to spend your time at the Getty Center, among other thoughts.

4. In-N-Out for Lunch

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While it’s not the best meal you’ll find in Los Angeles, it is the most iconic. Moreover, with this itinerary, we’re looking for something that is, literally, in and out, to make it to the next stop fairly quickly. I’ve already belabored the point that In-N-Out Burger is a California institution that you must visit when in California, so I won’t rehash that here.

Even though it has many locations throughout Southern California (you’ll want to stop at the one located at 4444 Van Nuys Blvd in Sherman Oaks–it’s right on the way), In-N-Out is perpetually busy. Fortunately, the restaurant is incredibly efficient. Even if the drive-through line is long–and it probably will be–you can expect to have your order in 10 minutes or so, particularly with a mid-afternoon visit like this.

5. Studio Tour

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Although our Sony Pictures Studio Tour Review indicated that we preferred that one, it also expressed a lot of potential downside. Not only is the “safer” option the Warner Bros. Studio Tour (read our review of the Warner Bros. Studio Tour), but it’s the tour that’s more conveniently-located for this itinerary, which makes it our recommendation. Studio tours are a distinctly Hollywood experience, and even though it’s not technically in Los Angeles, it’s a stone’s throw away. You need to book this in advance, and we’d recommend booking the 3 p.m. tour to accommodate the final stops on this itinerary. (If you arrive slightly early or late, you’ll still be accommodated.)

Another alternative, albeit one we do not recommend if you have only a single day to experience Los Angeles, is Universal Studios Hollywood. While we love Universal Studios Hollywood, the problem here is that it’s an all-day experience with the studio tour only being one element of that experience. With this itinerary, you only have a few hours to allocate towards a studio tour. However, if money is no issue (1-day tickets are roughly double the cost of other studio tours) and/or you’re really into Harry Potter, you might want to give Universal Studios Hollywood consideration. If you do opt to go this route, you’ll probably want to cut the Getty Center from the itinerary, and also plan on doing dusk at Griffith Observatory, rather than sunset.

6. Sunset at Griffith Observatory

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When people come to visit us from out of state, there are only three things that are must dos: Victoria Beach (it’s in Laguna Beach, so too far south for this itinerary), In-N-Out Burger (check!), and Griffith Observatory. For me, this is the crown jewel of Los Angeles, and a visit to Griffith Observatory offers much more than meets the eye.

First of all, the approach will take you through the residential side of Los Feliz, seeing some ritzy homes of L.A.’s more affluent residents and getting a feel for charming residential architecture. (If you take a detour up Glendower Ave, you can spot Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Ennis House from the street.) Second, Griffith Park is one of the largest urban parks in the United States, and offers a number of hiking options (if you’re so inclined). Third, it’s a beautiful observatory and contains quintessential examples of Art Deco styles. Finally, it offers incredible views of Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and the Hollywood sign.

If you have the time, consider doing the hike out to the Hollywood sign, which is relatively easy and offers enjoyable views of Los Angeles (and potentially Burbank, depending upon your route). Regardless of what you do, be sure to stick around for both sunset and dusk at Griffith Observatory. Watching the sun light fade away and the skyline light up is really fun to watch.

7. Hollywood Nights

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You’ll find a lot of itineraries that fixate on Hollywood. This is not one of them. I can appreciate that Hollywood is a defining aspect of Los Angeles and it’s what many tourists come to see and experience. Guidebooks and travel bloggers realize this, and recommend seeing things in Hollywood to give readers what they (think they) want.

The problem with this is that the most accessible elements of Hollywood to a tourist are, well, really touristy. Touristy to a fault. The Hollywood Walk of Fame is filled with costumed characters looking for money, and pushy street vendors selling junk. Other aspects of Hollywood Boulevard are run-down, shadows of their former selves.

Instead of recommending that you spend any time in Hollywood during the day when it’s overrun with other tourists and these vendors, we recommend a nighttime visit when the lights are bright, the temperature cooler, and fewer people are out. Most of the most iconic Hollywood spots are fairly superficial, so it won’t take you long to wander around, snap a few photos, and be on your way.

For a real slice of Hollywood, consider seeing a concert at the Hollywood Bowl (if visiting in summer) or seeing a movie in the Cinerama Dome, TCL Chinese Theater, or El Capitan, all of which are iconic and excellent theaters. For other things to do or not do in the area, see our Tips for Visiting Hollywood California post.

8. Daikokuya Dinner

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With a location conveniently located on West Hollywood’s Sunset Strip, Daikokuya is our pick for dinner. Whatever your preconceived notions about ramen, throw them out the window. Daikokuya is one of our favorite restaurants in Los Angeles, and is so popular among locals that its original Little Tokyo location has spawned several satellite restaurants.

As we note in our Daikokuya v. Tsujita LA post, we slightly prefer the latter. Theoretically, you could stop at Tsujita LA’s Glendale location (and also see the Glendale Galleria, which is a solid outdoor mall) before heading to Griffith Observatory for sunset. Depending upon how quickly you finish at the Getty Center and Warner Bros, that might be realistic. Considering the potential wait at Tsujita–and afternoon traffic–I think that might be cutting it too close. Just as well, as Daikokuya is incredible ramen, and probably a better “gateway” option if you’ve never had high end ramen before.

Phew, that’s it! All told, this itinerary is 61.1 miles (excluding the commute to Malibu from your hotel and from Daikokuya to your hotel) and the driving will consume roughly 2 hours of your day in normal traffic. Considering the sprawling layout of Los Angeles and everything you’ll see, I’d say that’s not too bad.

Hopefully this 1-day Los Angeles itinerary helps you have a jam-packed experience if you only have one day to spend in L.A. For those who have a bit more time, we’ll have multi-day itineraries soon!

If you’re planning a California vacation, check out my California category of posts for other things to do. For Los Angeles-centric trips, we’ve found the most useful guidebook to be The Best Things to Do in Los Angeles: 1001 Ideas, which is written by locals (and we use it even as locals!). If you enjoyed this post, help spread the word by sharing it via social media. Thanks for reading!

Your Thoughts

Have you visited any of the places in this itinerary? If so, what did you think of them? If you’re an Angeleno, what do you think of this itinerary? Anywhere you’d recommend that didn’t make the list? Anywhere you’d recommending skipping that did make the list? Questions? Hearing from you is half the fun, so if you need personalized advice or have suggested revisions to this Los Angeles itinerary, we’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

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13 replies
  1. Kayla
    Kayla says:

    Of course I’d be interested in a Walt Disney itinerary! I’d also be interested in like a part day LAX area itinerary. We’re splitting up flights between days, but not sure what’s practical to reach in a short time.

    Reply
  2. Victoria Shingleton
    Victoria Shingleton says:

    YES!!! As a west LA resident, I prefer Daikokuya is far better than Tsujita (while my S.O. favors the latter). Other favorites on Sawtelle – Seoul House of Tofu (not ramen, warm Korean soup and rice – so good!) and Shen-Sen-Gumi which is a little further north on Sawtelle.

    Reply
  3. Kevin
    Kevin says:

    I really like the choice of photos for Wilshire Drive! I wonder if people named Wadsworth get free admission…

    The only part of this that we followed on our 1-day in LA was the lunch stop at Inn-n-Out (We saw Hollywood, drove along Sunset/Mulholland, and saw the Endeavour; followed by dinner at Downtown Disney).

    Reply
    • Kevin
      Kevin says:

      I also have to admit that when I saw the title of the article I wondered if the recommendation would be for 1 meal at In-N-Out or double dipping for lunch and dinner…

      Reply
    • Tom Bricker
      Tom Bricker says:

      Two stops at In-N-Out would be excessive if you only have one day. Even though it’s not one of the objectively-best restaurants in Los Angeles, it scores major points for it’s “National Burger Landmark” status, value for money, and taste. 😉

      Reply
  4. Jennifer
    Jennifer says:

    Tom, If you like Thai Food, you really need to try TOI on Sunset Blvd. It’s a little whole in the wall “Rock N Roll” Thai food place that is open until 4am. LOVE the atmosphere! Try the Yellow Curry Chicken or the Garlic Pepper Beef! The TOI fried rice is also great as are the spring rolls! I lived in LA for my entire life (just moved to Portland Oregon), and it was my favorite Thai food ever. A runner up would be Siam Cabin on Ventura Blvd in Sherman Oaks;)

    Reply
  5. Lisa
    Lisa says:

    I would love to see a 1 day Walt Disney itinerary…but also maybe weeklong California itinerary- Disneyland, Universal, LA, and San Diego?

    Reply

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